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Translate this page into:

Image Correspondence
2 (
1
); 52-53
doi:
10.25259/IJPGD_4_2024

Dermoscopy of Cutaneous Larva Migrans

Department of Dermatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry, India
Corresponding author Arun Somasundaram, Department of Dermatology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry, India. arunsomasundaram25@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Somasundaram A, Murugan K. Dermoscopy of Cutaneous Larva Migrans. Indian J Postgrad Dermatol. 2024;2:52-3. doi: 10.25259/IJPGD_4_2024

A man in his 20s presented with itchy skin lesions over the right side of his trunk for 1-week duration. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple skin-coloured linear bizarre tracts and papules over the right side of the trunk extending to the arm and axilla [Figure 1a and b]. The rest of the mucocutaneous examination was non-contributory. A diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans was made. The patient was initiated on tablet albendazole 400 mg along with tablet ivermectin for 3 days following which he had improvement in skin lesions [Figure 1c]. Dermoscopy examination revealed brownish linear serpiginous tracts suggestive of cutaneous larva migrans [Figure 2]. The brownish linear serpiginous tracts suggest a larval body and brownish dots represent an empty larval tract in the image [Figure 2]. Larva migrans is usually a diagnosis made clinically, however, dermoscopy can aid as an adjunct to the diagnosis.

Figure 1:
(a) Multiple skin-coloured linear bizarre tracts and papules over the right side of the trunk extending to the arm and axilla. (b) Close-up image showing serpiginous tracts of larva migrans. (c) Improvement in skin lesions noted on follow-up after 3 weeks.
Figure 2:
Dermoscopy image (DermLite, × 10, polarised mode) revealed brownish linear serpiginous tracts (larval body) with brownish dots (empty larval tract) suggestive of cutaneous larva migrans.

Ethical approval

Institutional Review Board approval is not required.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Use of artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted technology for manuscript preparation

The authors confirm that there was no use of artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted technology for assisting in the writing or editing of the manuscript and no images were manipulated using AI.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.


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