Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
ANNOUNCEMENT
Case Report
Case Series
Clinicodermoscopic Challenge
Clinicopathologic Challenge
Correspondence
Editorial
Faculty’s Forum
Image Correspondence
Innovations and Ideas
Letter to Editor
Original Article
Post Graduate Thesis Section
Quiz
Research Methodology and Publishing
Resident’s Forum
Review Article
Reviewers 2023
Short Communication
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
ANNOUNCEMENT
Case Report
Case Series
Clinicodermoscopic Challenge
Clinicopathologic Challenge
Correspondence
Editorial
Faculty’s Forum
Image Correspondence
Innovations and Ideas
Letter to Editor
Original Article
Post Graduate Thesis Section
Quiz
Research Methodology and Publishing
Resident’s Forum
Review Article
Reviewers 2023
Short Communication
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
ANNOUNCEMENT
Case Report
Case Series
Clinicodermoscopic Challenge
Clinicopathologic Challenge
Correspondence
Editorial
Faculty’s Forum
Image Correspondence
Innovations and Ideas
Letter to Editor
Original Article
Post Graduate Thesis Section
Quiz
Research Methodology and Publishing
Resident’s Forum
Review Article
Reviewers 2023
Short Communication
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Correspondence
1 (
2
); 119-120
doi:
10.25259/IJPGD_30_2023

Dermoscopy-assisted Radiofrequency-facilitated Extraction of a Live Tick

Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Shri B. M. Patil Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, BLDE (Deemed to be University), Vijayapur, Karnataka, India
Corresponding author: Arun C. Inamadar, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Shri B. M. Patil Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, BLDE (Deemed to be University), Vijayapur, Karnataka, India. aruninamadar@gmail.com
Licence
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, transform, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

How to cite this article: Kavya R, Hyder MS, Adya KA, Inamadar AC. Dermoscopy-assisted Radiofrequency-facilitated Extraction of a Live Tick. Indian J Postgrad Dermatol 2023;1:119-20.

To the editor,

A middle-aged man presented with a painful skin lesion near the left axilla from the past 10 days. Examination revealed a tick embedded with its mouthparts inside the skin with surrounding erythema. Dermoscopy showed a live eight-legged tick with its body, legs and scutum visible outside and its mouthparts embedded deep inside [Video 1].

Video 1:

Video 1:Videodermoscopy illustrating the role of dermoscopy in the diagnosis and management of tick infestation (Polarised dermoscopy [DermLite™ DL3, 3Gen Inc., San Juan Capistrano, CA, USA], ×10).

Ticks are well known vectors in the transmission of Lyme disease and rickettsial infections. Hence, recognition of tick infestation and their complete removal is important. Dermoscopy has been utilised to good effect in this regard. Dermoscopy not only visualises the tick in vivo and provides a magnified illuminated field during the procedure of its removal but it also helps in assessing the wound and ex vivo examination of the tick after its removal to confirm the adequacy of the procedure and morphological identification of the tick.[1-3] [Video 1] illustrates the utility of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of tick infestation and its removal. We employed a low energy radiofrequency cautery to inactivate the tick.[4] The mouth parts of the tick were then gently grasped with fine-tipped forceps and pulled out slowly without compression or twisting. On removal, the mouth parts (hypostome and palps) were clearly visible suggesting complete extraction [Figure 1]. The extracted tick showed morphological characters of Dermacentor variabilis (dog tick).[5] A dermoscopic examination of the wound did not show any remnants.

Figure 1:
Ex vivo dermoscopy showing the dorsal (a) and ventral (b) aspects of the extracted tick. Note the palps (black arrow), hypostome (blue arrow), scutum (yellow arrow), body (yellow star) and festooning (white arrows) in the dorsal aspect. The ventral aspect shows the anus (green solid arrow) with anal grove (green hollow arrow) and four pairs of legs on either side (Polarised dermoscopy [DermLite™ DL3, 3Gen Inc., San Juan Capistrano, CA, USA], ×10).

Declaration of patient consent

Patient’s consent not required as there are no patients in this study.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

References

  1. , , . Dermoscopy-assisted tick extraction. Indian Dermatol Online J. 2019;11:682-3.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  2. , , , . Dermoscopy for tick bite: Reconfirmation of the usefulness for the initial diagnosis. Case Rep Dermatol. 2011;3:94-7.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  3. Tick Bites. Available from: https://dermoscopedia.org/Tick_bites [Last accessed on 2023 Mar 02]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. , . Radiofrequency device for tick removal. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2015;72:e155-6.
    [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  5. Dermacentor Variabilis. Available from: https://www.animaldiversity.org/accounts/dermacentor_variabilis [Last accessed 2023 Mar 02]
    [Google Scholar]

Fulltext Views
772

PDF downloads
570
View/Download PDF
Download Citations
BibTeX
RIS
Show Sections